Scrabble outranks all other games

This evening’s Scrabble game was one to remember, so I thought I’d make a note of it before I forgot πŸ™‚

We both had a seven-letter word. For Shana it was OUTRANKS (netting a measly 70 points), and for me it was OXIDiSE, worth a colossal 104.

Other notable high points were Shana’s placing of BROWS into the top right triple word square (TWS) followed not long aftwerwards by my extending it into EYEBROWS, thereby taking advantage of the top centre TWS.

Shana’s last go saw her adding an R to my ‘SCARE’ to make SCARER and also using that final R as the last letter of FOUR, thus getting 57 points by using the bottom centre TWS from both directions. Nice πŸ™‚

I closed with a whole five points all at once, with the word AIR.

Scores were 421 for Shana and 437 for moi. This is the first time in a good long while that we have both scored over 400 points each, and with such a slim winning margin we often class such a game as a virtual if not an actual draw. Tonight’s game was all the more remarkable as it was played with both of us feeling a bit under the weather, I with an annoying pulled muscle somewhere between my head and my feet (sorry readers, but I must invoke patient confidentiality on this occasion πŸ™‚ ) and Shana with Delhi belly or some such lurgy, after eating too much pork pie this afternoon. Such niggles can of course affect one’s memtal faculties and hence one’s Scrabble skills into the bargain. This evening however, I think we coped superbly. I shall therefore award us both a gold star each πŸ™‚

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Scrabble humdinger

Wednesday evening’s Scrabble game was a humdinger, with no fewer than four seven-letter words.

Unfortunately, I had only one of them. Shana got the other three. They were, with the usual lowercase letter indicating the crafty use of a blank tile, as follows: UTILISE (that was mine πŸ™‚ ),UNSATED, INACTIoN, and MINERAL.

The scores were 388 to me and a whopping 493 to Shana. Β However, I have a dastardly plan involving ‘Fluffbert’ (our mini-vacuum cleaner) and one or two ‘stray’ tiles. Β It’s either that or, as I am in charge of the scoresheets, perhaps a little of that famous ‘Hollywood accounting’ when it comes to totting up time.

The stakes are high though. I might end up eating bread crusts every meal for a week if my ruse fails πŸ™‚

Scrabbuteo?

Shana and I have an uncanny, and at times infuriating, habit of (not to put too fine a point on it) pinching each other’s place on the Scrabble board. Thus, among dozens of other examples, in a recent game I had spotted a lucrative chance where I could not only use my Z twice on the same double word square, but also put down the words OZONE and ADZ. Shana put the kybosh on my plans by sticking down the word IN.

‘”In”?’ I said, remonstrating with Shana afterwards. ‘Hardly great literature, is it?’

Shana was equally put out though, as apparently I had unwittingly nicked a few of the places she was going to use too. I don’t know if it’s down to telepathy, sheer bad luck, or what. But whatever is causing these Scrabble clashes, we have devised a plan.

‘You’d better mark the squares you want to use,’ said Shana. ‘Like the way a golfer uses a special personalised marker for the ball. I have just the right idea: put a little Subbuteo footballer on the board to reserve your chosen squares. I’ll do the same. Then we won’t hinder each other’s scoring opportunities any longer.’

Well, Shana may have had the Clever Idea of the Year (and it’s still only April πŸ™‚ ) but it just raises another problem. Which Subbuteo figure to choose? Shana probably wants someone traditional like Stanley Matthews, or maybe one of those women footballers that nobody has ever heard of. (Oops, I’ll get comments galore about that, I can tell πŸ™‚ )

Me? Well, I’ve already chosen mine. A retired striker who is now a tv star in his own right. Yes, none other than the great…

Dion Dulbin πŸ™‚

Quisling

Scrabble weirdness continued today, following on from our recent drawn games. We always dip into the tile bag to decide who puts down the first word. Whoever pulls out the tile closest to A is the one who starts. Today we both drew a blank tile. There are only two in the set, so we dipped into the bag for a second time. This time I won. No more than I deserved though, I thought. ‘Actually, your blank tile was a Z,’ I quipped, ‘whereas mine was an A. Just thought I should point that out.’ πŸ™‚

Shana had the last word this afternoon though. She’d already had HUsTLER but I was chuffed to score a whole 79 points at once by placing MINXES down from a triple word score (with the X landing on a double letter bonus) and thereby pluralising Shana’s earlier BINDER. I looked set to waltz away with this afternoon’s Scrabble laurels, when Shana suddenly cleared out all her remaining tiles with QUISLING. She has a habit of giving two sharp raps on the table with her wooden tile rack whenever she uses up all her letters. One day she’ll get splinters doing that! πŸ™‚

quisling

Scrabble score draws

Yesterday, Shana finished crocheting a new bag for our Scrabble tiles. It’s a rather fetching shade of hot pink πŸ™‚ with a narrow contrasting band midway up and for the draw cord. (I made a length of cordage for this purpose using my trusty lucet.)

Today, we played two games of Scrabble, one in the afternoon and one this evening, and both times our scores were exactly the same: 342 and 371. Given that we are both quite competitive, I wonder what the odds must be of two score draws in one day. Cue theme from The Twilight Zone πŸ™‚